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a newbie question..

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Posted on September 27, 2016 at 23:13:59
cloudwalker
Audiophile

Posts: 539
Location: central wa
Joined: September 27, 2012
you have taught me that movie DVD's can contain up to 5 audio tracks....if some DVD's are made for 7.1 systems, where do the 2 additional tracks come from? Are they "sysenthized" by the receiver? I have searched online, but cannot find the answer...

 

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RE: a newbie question.., posted on September 28, 2016 at 23:26:45
mrdavis842
Audiophile

Posts: 259
Joined: February 22, 2013

Yes with a DVD the receiver matrices the additional 2 channels, on Blu-ray they are discrete channels. The linked article is a pretty good read for understanding surround sound.

 

good article, but?, posted on September 29, 2016 at 13:08:22
cloudwalker
Audiophile

Posts: 539
Location: central wa
Joined: September 27, 2012

I am still confused... how many audio tracks are on a standard DVD? How many on a 7.1 DVD? Or a 7,1 Blu Ray disk? How many are on an Atmos disk? Do you need a special Blu Ray player for that? Do you need a special interface for Dolby Atmos?

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RE: good article, but?, posted on September 29, 2016 at 16:39:15
mrdavis842
Audiophile

Posts: 259
Joined: February 22, 2013

Normally there are up to 6 discreet channels (5.1) on a DVD, with the exception of DTS-EX Discreet 6.1 which added another discreet channel for a total of 7 discreet channels. So if you include DTS-EX discreet then there can be up to 7 discreet channels on a DVD. I say up to because you can have as little as 2 channels and matrix them to 5.1 or even 6.1/7.1 but there would still only be 2 channels just as a 5.1 channel DVD matrix processed to 7.1 channels is still only 6 discreet channels. A DVD does not have room for the additional channels so they have to be matrix processed by the receiver so for 7.1 there are 6 discreet + 2 matrix channels.

A Blu-ray disk has space for up to 8 discreet channels so no matrix process is needed for 7.1 channels. A Blu-ray disk can have less than 8 discreet channels. If it has less, say 5.1 channels, it would have 6 discreet channels. It could also have 6 discreet channels (instead of 8) + 2 additional matrix channels to make 7.1 channels.

If it is a 9.1/9.2/11.1/11.2 channel Blu-ray disk then the additional channels are matrix processed similar to the additional channels on a DVD.


For Dolby Atmos and DTS:X look at these articles:

http://www.techradar.com/news/audio/dolby-atmos-a-step-by-step-guide-to-the-premature-speaker-tech-1305066

http://www.audioholics.com/audio-technologies/dolby-atmos-home-theater-101

http://www.soundandvision.com/content/first-listen-dolby-atmos-right-home

 

thank you for a simple, clear explination, posted on September 29, 2016 at 21:35:53
cloudwalker
Audiophile

Posts: 539
Location: central wa
Joined: September 27, 2012
I think I understated everything. Hard to believe someone thought we needed 64 pairs of speakers. Seems to me a 6.1 system is adequate (5,1 + a speaker overhead to make sound 3 dimensional) I wonder how many speaker terminals they will try to put on the back. I read that a simple coax cable will not work (Only HDMI). Wonder why?

 

RE: thank you for a simple, clear explination, posted on September 30, 2016 at 15:57:56
mrdavis842
Audiophile

Posts: 259
Joined: February 22, 2013
That is for commercial use. I was thinking the same thing, 64 speakers seems like a lot even for a very large cinema movie theater. I don't think they are required to use that many though, I'm sure they can install much less.

I think for home owners that go the Atmos surround sound route most will settle for 5.1.2 with a smaller percentage going for 7.1.2 or even 7.1.4. People with a large dedicated home theater room (projector style) maybe 9.1.4/9.2.4 or even 11.1.4/11.2.4.

Manufacturers only use HDMI (no coax) to carrier the high def digital data signal for video and audio because of the required content protection (HDCP). You can use the same HDMI cables you are already using for HD Audio/1080p/4K.

 

has anyone even determined whether this improves, posted on October 6, 2016 at 22:19:35
jedrider
Audiophile

Posts: 11730
Location: No. California
Joined: December 26, 2003
the video experience?

It seems to me a great way, however, of introducing a lot of inexpensive loudspeakers when just a few good ones would have done a far better job, but at greater overall cost.

Of course, selling to an audiophile, one makes a killing in home theater!

 

I agree, posted on October 7, 2016 at 12:44:15
cloudwalker
Audiophile

Posts: 539
Location: central wa
Joined: September 27, 2012
It seems to me 5.1 is fine. Add a ceiling speaker (since a "floor" speaker is impractical), and you get that 3D affect.

 

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