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"Andrei Rublev" (1966)

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Posted on April 4, 2021 at 14:03:26
Bambi_B
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Inmates,

I hadn't seen "Andrei Rublev" in a long while- probably twenty years. This is because, for one thing, it's difficult to find, but more so it's such a viscerally memorable movie- absolutely terrifyingly violent and yet simultaneously so poetic and beautifully made by Tarkovsky that it's overwhelming seen too often. It's a movie not to get too used to.

Thinking of Andre Rublev and Tarkovsky's "Solaris" (1972) and the palpable yet surreal, dream-like qualities of both- one medieval, one in the future Sci-Fi, I think he was a greater emotionally subtle director then Bergman. It's worth watching once without the subtitles to concentrate on the ambience of the brilliant B&W photography. Color would've ruined it.

Solaris next!

Bambi_B

 

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RE: "Andrei Rublev" (1966), posted on April 4, 2021 at 17:10:19
Rod H.
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It's actually on YouTube along with many, perhaps all, of his others. I know The Sacrifice, Mirror, Ivan's Childhood, and Nostalgia are. Not sure about Stalker or Solaris. However I think the last time I saw Solaris was on YouTube about six months ago. I have seen them all multiple times, except Nostalgia and Ivan's Childhood, which I have seen once.

What can I say about his films? I am semi-obsessed with Solaris and Mirror, and just keep watching them over and over. :)

 

Of course, Andrei R does have some color! I agree with your enthusiasm about Tarkovsky: , posted on April 5, 2021 at 06:47:05
tinear
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April 8, 2006
a genius with few peers in all of filmdom. Kanopy and Criterion, btw, always have some of his films. "Mirror" is very different from either of those, but equally fascinating--- and great!

 

RE: "Andrei Rublev" (1966), posted on April 5, 2021 at 11:00:38
Mike B.
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Also available on Prime


 

"I am semi-obsessed with Solaris and Mirror," And for good reason, posted on April 9, 2021 at 05:50:36
Victor Khomenko
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Posts: 47957
Joined: April 5, 2000
Those two are his best works, I think.

It might be interesting to note the local reaction to their releases.

The Solaris was a big "Huh?", with not much more than the teenagers, who recently read the Lem's work, going to see it. Certainly not a movie for the masses. Narrow distribution, as far as I recall, one or two theaters in the city.

BTW, Lem initially HATED the film, it wasn't until the truly lame Soderbergh's version appeared that he came to peace with Tarkovsky's masterpiece.

The Mirror, shown more widely, created a stir, with perhaps 95% of viewers expressing strong negative feelings. "Too Western", and "decadent" were the most common labels. At our large department there were maybe 3-5 people who loved it... I honestly don't recall my initial reaction, other than it being "strange" - most of us were ill prepared for such work. I think I truly appreciated it years later, upon our second viewing.



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  • At my university, "Solaris" was a huge hit, as it was with many Western critics. Not a few, posted on April 9, 2021 at 07:03:35
    tinear
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    put it above Kubrick's "2001." "Mirror," indeed, was far quieter.

    I'd argue that "Andrei Rublev" is his greatest work, having far more important thematic development and a sweeping, "War and Peace" breadth. Cinematographically, it is magnificent, with few equals.

     

    To students the Reds could do no wrong, posted on April 9, 2021 at 07:26:08
    Victor Khomenko
    Manufacturer

    Posts: 47957
    Joined: April 5, 2000
    They were predisposed to love anything that came out of that shithole.

    Make no mistake about it - much of Tarkovsky's art was imitating the great Western one. His adoration of Bergman, to the point of working with Sven Nykvist - all are derivative to various degrees.


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  • So Vadim Yusov was a slavish imitator of Nykvist? And Tarkovsky of Bergman? , posted on April 10, 2021 at 05:33:23
    tinear
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    As far as your comments, many emigrants from former repressive regimes, for whatever reason, end up hating not just the political conditions they fled, but also the entire culture they view as tainted. Some go so far as to hate the people themselves whom they feel are wholly responsible. This loathing can extend to themselves or, in an odd reversal, to a feeling of great superiority to all those other horrible millions they left behind.

     

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